View from Big Moose Mountain

View from Big Moose Mountain

On Sunday, April 15th, Frosty and I snowshoed up Big Moose Mountain, the mountain formerly known as Big Squaw. The road to the trail head was frozen when we drove in. It is a dirt road with active logging going on. The logging trucks have the right of way. With the snow, the road is narrow. The parking lot at the trailhead was plowed.

Lichen on a Tree Branch Big Moose Mountain

Lichen on a Tree Branch Big Moose Mountain

It was overcast and a chilly 18 degrees when we started.  I had my windbreaker on, but not for long. I debated whether to start with it on or not. I knew I’d warm up once we started on the trail. I decided to because we put our snowshoes on up on the trail. I did not want to get chilled while gearing up.

The Early Part of the Trail Had Bare Spots That Were Easy to Get Around

The Early Part of the Trail Had Bare Spots That Were Easy to Get Around

There were some bare spots on the bottom section of the trail, but it was easy to stay on the snow and go around them. Frosty pointed out a tree that a moose had scraped his antlers against. The tree was not far off the trail, but I had walked past it oblivious. Frosty notices these types of things, having spent his childhood in the woods.

Old Fire Warden's Cabin on Big Moose Mountain

Old Fire Warden’s Cabin on Big Moose Mountain

At the nearly 1.5 mile point, is an old fire warden’s cabin and then a nice ravine. In the summer, the stream tumbles down the rocks and is quite scenic. The water, probably frozen, was under a blanket of snow. The sun came out when we got to the cabin.

View of the Peak of Big Moose Mountain from the Scenic Overlook

View of the Peak of Big Moose Mountain from the Scenic Overlook

From the cabin, there is a steep section of trail. The trail splits off to a scenic overlook. We had great views from the overlook, the peak, and through the trees as we got closer to the top. We saw the Bigelows, Sugarloaf, Kineo, Katahdin, Borestone, and many more. Plus, all the frozen lakes and ponds adding to the snowy landscape. You can also see Eagle Rock from here.

Frosty Scooches under Trees across the Trail

Frosty Scooches under Trees across the Trail

We had to crawl and scooch under a few trees that had fallen across the trail. Frosty could step over a couple that I crawled under. When we got to the top, we put on warmth and wind layers. It was windy at the peak. 

Frosty on Big Moose Mountain

Frosty on Big Moose Mountain

There are several viewpoints along the top if you keep going. The trees encroach the trail as you head to the last set of viewpoints. It is worth pushing through the branches to get that view.

View from Big Moose Mountain

View from Big Moose Mountain

As we headed back down, the sky became overcast again. Even though the temperature was 27 degrees when we finished our hike, the sun that was out earlier and traffic on the road into the trailhead made the road a bit slippery with a layer of mud.

Moose Antler Scrape

Moose Antler Scrape

Both Big Moose and Eagle Rock are part of Moosehead Lake Region’s Pinnacle Pursuit program. During the summer of 2017, Frosty and I hiked the trails in the Pinnacle Pursuit.

Gear used:

Frosty:

Tubbs Flex VRT Snowshoes, Black Diamond Trail Shock Trekking Poles, Limmers, LL Bean gaiters, Darn Tough Socks, Yama Pogies, LL Bean Mittens, Gossamer Gear KumoStormy Kromer The SK Outfitter Vest, 1/4 zip wool shirt, Buff merino wool neckwearJohnson Woolen Mill Worsted Wool Pants, and Aloha Eyewear Stone Creek MX1 Men’s Wraparound Bi-focal Sunglasses 

Magoo:

Tubbs Flex ALP snowshoes, Black Diamond Trail Shock Trekking Pole, Stormy Kromer Ida Outfitter Vest, Buff merino wool neckwear,  Apana running mittens, Darn Tough socks, LL Bean AT 38 Day Pack backpack (the link is the updated version of Magoo’s pack), merino wool leggings, Layer 8 wind pants, Cabela’s Women’s Ultimate Lightweight Merino shirt, Kamik Greenbay 4 Boots, Russel Windbreaker, Costa prescription sunglasses, L.L. Bean Packaway Mittens, earband, and OR gaiters.


Magoo

I like to get outdoors and enjoy life. I hike, snowshoe, run races, travel, camp, and sometimes just sit.

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